Tag:Practical

So You Want to Be a Montessori Parent, But…

Let’s say you’re sold – you believe that Montessori is the right path for you and your family. What are the most common obstacles between parents and this choice?

What Your Child Needs to Hear

We’ve spoken extensively on the theory of parent-child communication – rightfully so, as it is one of the most essential parts of parenting. So here is the practice: concrete examples of the five most useful and important phrases in any...

Montessori Parenting in the 21st Century – Part 2

Montessori education first flourished more than a century ago. What is different now and then, and what are the most common obstacles Montessori parents run into?

What does grace and courtesy look like in practice?

The purpose of the Grace and Courtesy curriculum in Montessori is to offer our children the best possible assistance on this path. Explaining and modeling clearly, we share the most harmonious ways of behaving, relating and communicating, and help children practice and master...

Montessori Parenting in the 21st Century

What does it mean to be a Montessori parent? Can it be balanced with busy lives, complicated schedules, limited budgets and varying resources?

Pretending, Imagining, and Creating

It is true that Montessori classrooms lack the traditional “pretend play” toys and equipment, like play kitchens and play tools, play castles or stuffed animals. This is not because we don’t value imaginative play – quite the opposite. But we prefer to give the children different tools and opportunities for it.  

The Child Who is Not Peaceful

In Montessori, we believe in each child’s innate goodness, their potential for peace and grace. How do we approach the small child who is anything but – the child who hits and hurts others?

In Praise of the Puddle

This week, we take a break from the Communication Series to consider some of the most wonderful educational materials that Mother Nature provides our children.

Weathering Emotional Storms

Screaming, stomping, angry tears and tantrums – no parent’s favourite thing, but a part of raising a child, nonetheless. What Montessori lessons can we apply to managing tumultuous emotions in a child?

Praise

“You’re such a good boy!” “Here’s a gold star for you.” “What fantastic job!” A child won’t hear any of these in a Montessori classroom. Should they hear praise like this at home?